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The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has placed our increasingly interconnected world in an unprecedented situation. This crisis has generated human distress and an economic downturn that is impacting global efforts to improve livelihoods and achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the early response to restraining the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has shown, limited
Member States in the ECE and WHO European Region established the Transport,Health and Environment Pan European Programme (THE PEP) in 2002. By providing an intersectoral and intergovernmental policy framework, THE PEP promotes mobility and transport strategies that integrate environmental and health concerns. Over the years, THE PEP has led to the development of implementation mechanisms to
Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is a new mobility concept gaining pace in many cities around the world. Its value proposition concerns integration of mobility services which is realized by providing trip planning and one-stop fare purchase for the user through a single platform.Since MaaS is only emerging, the analysis of real-life demonstrations is still limited and, thus, evidence on the
Regional maps available here Extreme weather events, some of which are increasing in intensity and frequency, as well as slower onset climate changes (for example, sea level rise) and cumulative effects can result in transportation infrastructure damages, operational disruptions, and
During recent decades governments all around the world were faced with a complicated set of options for investing in transport, including transport infrastructure. This publication examines main principles for determining the most appropriate models for financing transport infrastructure expenditures but also illustrates and analyses many innovative ways to finance transport infrastructure.
This leaflet, prepared by the Sustainable Transport Division of the UNECE in cooperation with the International Road Transport Union (IRU), highlights the importance and potential benefits to Contracting Parties of the Customs Convention on the International Transport of Goods under Cover of TIR Carnets and the International Convention on the Harmonization of Frontier Controls of Goods.It
The inclusion of urban transport in the SDG 11 is further confirmation that transport is an essential component of the overall sustainable development. It is crucial to eradicating poverty and economic growth (access to markets and jobs), improving education (access to schools), protecting child and maternal health (access to medical services), and enhancing
Border inefficiencies are estimated to cost twice the amount of tariffs, while the removal of those inefficiencies could increase global trade by as much as US$ 1 trillion and create as many as 21 million jobs worldwide. Even though border crossing issues vary from
Diesel Engines Exhaust: Myths and RealitiesDownload PDF (English)The objective of this Discussion paper is:to offer a balanced view on the on‐going debate about the harmful effects of diesel engine exhaust emissions on human health and the environment;to take stock of recent studies on the
Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for International Transport Networks : interactive reportDownload PDF (English, also available in French and Russian)This report has been
Transport Trends and Economics 2011-2012Download PDF (English)
EATL Phase II Final ReportDownload PDF (English)
Content The first section describes the TIR transit system, its coverage, objective and functioning and analyses possible future developments. The second section contains the complete text of the TIR Convention. The third section contains related resolutions and recommendations.  
The OSCE-UNECE Handbook of Best Practices at Border Crossings – A Trade and Transport Facilitation Perspective offers a unique opportunity for countries both in and beyond the OSCE/UNECE region to develop
EnglishFollowing discussions about the need to update the methodology for the identification of bottlenecks and missing links adopted by the Inland Transport Committee in the early 1990s, government delegates in the UNECE Working Party on Transport Trends and Economics agreed to commission a new report on this topic. An informal group of